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multiresidential_architecture _windsor_2
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multiresidential_architecture _windsor_3
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multiresidential_architecture _windsor_1
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multiresidential_architecture _windsor_4
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multiresidential_architecture _windsor_6

Mcllwrick Street Apartments, Windsor

The McIlwrick Street Residences are a three townhouse development for a multi-generational family. Positioned on a single residential block, the design draws on its unique positioning adjacent to a quiet laneway in Windsor.

The original single-fronted terrace house is restored in keeping with it’s character as a stand-alone element forming one of the three residences. Connected by glazed walkway, two new residences are tucked behind the terrace house, creating an internal courtyard and physical separation between old and new architecture.

A series of rectilinear forms with deep-set punch windows are made in brick with black steel detailing as a reference to the materiality of the neighbouring laneway, characterised by brick walls and metal fences. While quite substantial in size and shape, the buildings intentionally recede into the surrounding context, so that they do not overpower the streetscape. The hard-edged forms are softened by climbing vines to add a sense of time to feel as though they have always been there.

Since the built area takes fills the majority of the site, the design is positioned to integrate the laneway as an additional outdoor terrace. Both residences open directly onto the laneway transforming it into a social place for the family members to congregate as well as a protected area for their children to play.

In addition to the collective outdoor space in the laneway, each unit has its own private terrace. The internal terraces and skylights provide generous lighting into the interior spaces. The interiors of the residences have slightly different materials palettes so that each has its own identity. The original house has referential period detailing, one residence is brighter white with poured concrete benches and one is a darker neutral scheme in warm grey and timber.